Committed to early learning nationwide

PROGRESSIVE AND INCLUSIVE: Staff and children at Gateshead Goodstart engage in early learning activities.Goodstart Early Learning is Australia’s largest early learning provider, with 643 centres Australia wide.
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The not–for–profit social enterprise exists purely to improve the lives of Australia’s children and their families, with all surplus funds reinvested for the benefit of the children.

There are 10 Goodstart centres in the Newcastle region, located in Broadmeadow,Cameron Park, Cessnock, Gateshead, Glendale, New Lambton, Rutherford, Thornton,Anna Bay andNelson Bay.

“At any Goodstart Centre there is a focus on contemporary, inclusive and progressive play-based learning through an ‘attachment lens’,” Mandy Portlock, director of Nelson Bay Goodstart said.

“By attachment, I mean that we ensure all children are treated with dignity and have a strong bond with key adult educators, working together in small, tight-knit groups to reach the best possible learning outcomes.

“When childrenleave Goodstart, yes they can read their names and identify letters, they have had access to many early literacy opportunities, but they will also be armed with the skills to persevere, take on challenges, and realise they are part of a bigger picture world.”

Goodstart invests millions every year in the development, training and qualifications of their educators and the ongoing improvement of the centre environments and equipment.

“Goodstart provides professional development opportunities for staff and educators,” Mandy said.

“There’s fabulous access to technology likesmartboards in the rooms and robots that we use for programming, while the training is modern with a strong focus on infant psychology and learning.”

Each Goodstart centre aims to become the heart of an inclusive and supportive local community and welcomes every child regardless of their background or the challenges they may face, to help them reach their full potential.

Goodstart Nelson Bay, for example, works closely with other centres and schools in the Tomaree Transition to School Network.

“We believe relationships with families are just as important as those with the children,” Mandy said. “It leads to the best outcome for childrenand families. Goodstart provides its educators time to establish and maintain those relationships.”

Many of the Newcastle centres engage with their local Community Centres to provide external playgroups.

These playgroups give children who are not yet enrolled at Goodstart Early Learning exposure to early earning programs offered by qualified professionals.

“Families are welcome to come along to playgroup once a week. This is an excellent networking opportunity for families, builds community connectedness and supports our priorities of inclusion and partnership,” Mandy said.

“It’s part of our equity-of-access approach based on Goodstart’s guiding principle that all children are entitled to the best possible start in life regardless of their background.”

Goodstart staffwork closely with local Aboriginal groups to ensure culture is embedded and connection to country is established.

“The work is based around reconciliation, liaising with local land councils, attending meetings and smoking ceremonies and making ties in order to honour our first Australians,” Mandy said.

”Children do acknowledgment of country each morning, and we embedculture through everyday practices right down to planning gardens and going on excursions to get connection to country and understand what that country means to traditional custodians.”

Goodstart partners with local universities, colleges and schools to provide career pathways for indigenous students.

“Students can attend acentre one day a week in a structured and supported environment and get a feel for what it’s like to work at Goodstart,” Mandy said. “It’s all about increasing long-termengagement with the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce in orderto make reconciliation authentic.”

Goodstart staff and children regularly visit aged care facilities to provide inter-generational experiences

“It’s about working with children to build empathy and respect, and it’s a great outcome for both the children and the residents,” Mandy said.

“Nelson Bay has a large ‘transient’ community made up of ‘Sea Changers’ and Defence families, and often there’s not so much family support. By doing these visits we provide everyone with a chance for inter-generational experience.”

Goodstart Nelson Bay staff and children participate regularly in community events, like the Human Whale project each year.

“It’s a way to strengthen ties and be a presence in the community.”

To book a tour at your local centre, call 1800 222 543 or visitgoodstart.org419论坛.

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Connection to carer is key

FOCUS: Staff at Lambton Early Learning Centre create a safe and comfortable, home-away-from home environment where everyone is valued and treated with respect.
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Alicia Ferris is a qualified teacher and mother of four who understands what it’s like being a full-time working mum looking for childcare.

OUTSIDE IN: The award-winning layout of Lambton Early Learning Centre provides numerous spaces for age-appropriate play and education.

In many ways it’s why she established Lambton Early Learning Centre.

“Leaving your child with strangers and making sure they receive the highest level of care can be daunting,” Alicia said. “Finding a childcare centre near work is another challenge.”

When the old Salvation Army Church on Pearson Street in Lambton came up for sale a decade ago, Alicia and builder husband Josh saw the potential immediately.

“Childcare needsto be in the right location – this was close to John Hunter Hospital and Newcastle University, where people needed childcare,” Alicia said.

“As a building it had to be inspiring: a place that was great to work in, with great flow. The old church fit the bill perfectly.”

The pair renovated the historic building, winning a swag of awards along the way.

“We kept the bulk of building, but altered the layout and floor plan to bring the outside in and vice versa,” Alicia said.

“We created rooms for each age group, from babies through to five year olds, and made sure that all rooms had direct access to the outside so children could play in a safe environment.

“We used a lot of glass to promote vision inside and out and we made sure that the place feltlike a home away from home.”

Today Lambton Early Learning Centre is a fully-accredited, long-day, childcare centre with 21 staff providing individualised pre-school curriculum culminating in a school readiness program with high educator ratios right in the heart of suburban Newcastle,

Open 7.30am to 5.30pm each day, bar three weeks over Christmas, Lambton Early Learning Centre relies primarily on word of mouth to promote itself – no website or signs required.

But with enrolments for next year looming, and an extension recently completed, Alicia finds herself in a unique position.

“With our recently completed extension, we can offer a few new spots,” Alicia said.

“I want to let people who are looking for that connection with their carer to know that Lambton Early Learning might be the environment that’s right for their child.”

Connection is critical for the 130 families currently enrolled and thousands Alicia has dealt with over the last decade.

“As a parent, I know what a juggle it is and that your major concern is you’ve got a carer you can trust.

“I know what it’s like to sit in the car and cry that first day you drop them off, and I tell my parents it will be OK, that the things they learn will be amazing, and that we have that connection.

“Hearing from my families that they don’t worry about their child when they are in my care is my greatest reward.”

Staff retention has been central to establishing that connection.

“I recognise the great contribution educators make and work tirelessly to retain staff,” Alicia said. “Most of our staff have been here 10 years. They’re qualified, valued and amazing.”

Alicia’s passion for childcare is palpable.

“The relationships you have with a family can last for many years from one sibling to the next. This relationship that I develop with families is key to providing excellent childcare and is what brings me the most joy.”

To inquire about enrolments, ring Lambton Early Learning Centre on 02 4952 6568 or [email protected]南京夜网419论坛.

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‘There’s no cure’: Distressing diagnosis for one in five women

Lucy Ogden-Doyle was only 14 when she learnt she may develop fertility problems. It was distressing news for someone who went to see her GP about irregular periods.
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Her doctor said she might have a hormonal condition called polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and she should drop five kilograms – despite then being 52 kilograms and 172 centimetres tall – to “pre-empt” weight gain, a symptom.

Tessa Copp, a PhD student at University of Sydney, is the lead author of the BMJ article on the definition of polycystic ovary syndrome. Photo: Supplied – CareFlight Facebook page

“It was quite a dramatic thing to tell someone so young that they may be infertile and to lose weight, which would have made me underweight,” Ms Ogden-Doyle, now 24, said.

“Two years later I had tests and I do have PCOS but I’m not showing the symptoms like excess hair or extra weight so, while it has been a negative experience, right now I’m not letting it affect me.”

The arts student is among one in five women diagnosed with PCOS, a deeply stigmatising condition. The figure is based on eight separate studies across six countries including Australia and China.

PCOS, which occurs when a woman’s ovaries or adrenal glands produce more male hormones than normal, is the most commonly diagnosed endocrine disorder in reproductive aged women.

In an opinion article in the latest British Medical Journal, Australian researchers argue that an expanded definition had inadvertently led to overdiagnosis, and therefore too much treatment and even harm.

The widening of the definition (to include the sonographic presence of polycystic ovaries) in 2003 led to a dramatic increase in cases, from 5 to 21 per cent.

Lead author Tessa Copp, a PhD student at Sydney University, said many women were being “given a lifelong disease label” in their teenage years when symptoms such as acne and irregular periods overlapped with signs of puberty.

She referred to three studies that found the prevalence of PCOS by age decreased rapidly after 25, suggesting the symptoms may be transitory for some women.

“A lot of my friends had it and were feeling quite dissatisfied because there’s no cure, nothing you can do, except to undergo treatments that focus on alleviating symptoms,” she said.

“Some cases are severe and they will benefit from the label, but women with milder symptoms may experience harm from the overdiagnosis and overtreatment.”

The authors said women diagnosed with PCOS had higher levels of depression, anxiety, poorer self-esteem, negative body image, disordered eating and decreased sexual satisfaction.

They said it was unclear whether these impacts were due to the condition, its symptoms, or from the psychological effect of being labelled a PCOS sufferer.

“It’s associated with infertility, hypertension and type 2 diabetes, so it labels women as abnormal but the consequences are not the same for everyone,” Ms Copp said.

The authors argue that, given the uncertainties, the risk of psychological harm and the impacts of applying a one-size-fits-all diagnostic criteria to a wide-ranging set of symptoms, it was important for doctors not to rush diagnosing women.

“We need better understanding and research to characterise the benefits and harms of diagnosis and treatment for women with both severe and milder symptoms,” Ms Copp said.

“Instead of diagnosing women in adolescence, note they’re at risk, follow up with them over time and use treatments that target the symptoms.” Call to action

The article comes as influential health groups, including the Consumers Health Forum and the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, launch a call to action to address overdiagnosis in general and “the problem of too much medicine”.

In an initial statement via a Wiser Healthcare collaboration, they said there was an urgent need to develop a national action plan.

“Expanding disease definitions and lowering diagnostic thresholds are recognised as one driver of the problem, and the processes for changing definitions require meaningful reform,” it said.

Dr Ray Moynihan, from Bond University and a Wiser Healthcare member, said the problem of too much medicine was driven by many factors, including the best of intentions.

“PCOS appears to be a strong example of the problem of expanding disease definitions or lowering diagnostic thresholds that are potentially labelling too many people,” he said.

PCOS is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, high blood pressure and poorer psychological wellbeing.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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Low-profile Swan who could be their most important player against Crows?

Sydney’s most important player on Friday night may not be Lance Franklin, star midfielder Luke Parker or even returning skipper Josh Kennedy. In fact, he could be someone most football fans have heard little of.
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Youngster George Hewett does not have the profile of his more accomplished teammates but the second-year midfielder is set for the key job on Adelaide’s gun ball-winner Rory Sloane.

In the era of team defence, tagging is not as common as it was but there have been enough cases this year to show it’s not a dead craft. Think Levi Greenwood on Joel Selwood in round six or Greater Western Sydney’s Sam Reid on Brisbane star Dayne Zorko.

The Swans have made a habit of targeting the opposition’s best rebounding defender this year but it’s midfielder Sloane who has become Adelaide’s barometer.

The one time Brownlow favourite has proven susceptible when sat on and so too the Crows. While they have still won games with Sloane having little impact, his numbers are markedly higher when the Crows salute.

The gun midfielder is averaging 25.5 disposals and 8.2 score involvements when Adelaide win but that drops to 18.8 and 4.5, respectively, when they do not.

Hewett has proven to be adept at the dark art of tagging. His biggest scalp is Norm Smith Medallist Jason Johannisen, who was limited to just nine possessions, but he has also performed soundly on Selwood and Richmond superstar Dustin Martin.

Used primarily as a forward in his debut year, Hewett is now being given more time in the middle. He is following in the footsteps of former captain Kieren Jack, who cut his teeth as a stopper before becoming a fine midfielder in his own right.

Jack has said playing on Gary Ablett, Chris Judd and Ben Cousins helped his development. Hewett said he learned plenty in his three-quarters on Selwood.

“I expected he would be very physical,” Hewett said. “He’s just a natural competitor, he keeps going harder and harder and harder.

“The way he goes about it you can’t help but admire him at times. He’s always good to watch when you’re not playing.

“You have to be hard and clean on him. He doesn’t do much wrong. That’s why he’s so well respected. He’s as tough as they come. It was good to play against him and see what happens in there.”

While it’s in the midfield where Hewett’s long-term future lies, he has become one of the Swans’ more reliable kicks for goal at a time when the club has struggled in front of the big sticks.

Hewett has kicked 9.3 this year after managing 18.8 in 2016. He is also deadly on the set shot with a success rate of 89 per cent (eight from nine), placing him equal fifth for anyone who has kicked eight or more set shot goals this year.

“I had to work hard on it the past two years, it’s a big area I tried to improve on,” Hewett, who played his junior football as a midfielder, said.

“I knew if I could crack into the side I’d be forward and kicking goals is one of the most important things.”

Hewett says he has about 10-15 shots after training – “not a whole heap just in case you’re sore the next day” – for a 50/50 return. And there’s not much science behind his approach either.

“When you’re practising at training you feel comfortable in what you’re doing,” Hewett said. “Keep it simple, just kick it. Sometimes it is just as simple as that.”

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Warnings after $26,000 bill at Adamstown

HUNTER Water has reminded its customers to frequently check their household meters after an undetected leak at a house in Adamstown led to a$26,000 bill for the owners.
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The Newcastle couple were told in April they owed the staggering amount from an underground leak at their investment property in Adamstown that hemorrhaged11,773 cubic metres of water, almost enough to fill five Olympic pools.

Hunter Water said it hadconfirmedthe house’s meterwas accurate, then contacted the owners’ plumber to file an “undetectable leak rebate” or 50 per cent discount.

Following Newcastle Herald enquiries, the utility knocked a further 25 per cent off the exceptionally large bill.

“With the in-kind discount, the remaining payable water usage amount is 25 per centof the original bill. We’re committed to working with the property owner to ensure the payment plan is manageable and will not put the owner in a position of hardship,” a Hunter Water spokesman said.

“This is an unfortunate situation, and highlights the importance of maintaining access to your water meter and being vigilant of your private water usage.”

Hunter Water said its employees had twice tried to take readings at the Adamstown house but couldn’t access its meterbecause the property was overgrown.

It said it had warned the owners and requested a photo reading of the meter dial in order to calculatean accurate bill.

Had Hunter Wateremployeesbeen able to access or see a photo ofthe meter earlier, the utilitysaid,the leak couldhave been found andcontained.

“Hunter Water’s approach is to balance the value of water in the short and long-term with the cost to the wider customer base of subsidising the marginal costs of water used in these instances,” the spokesman said.

“The original [$14,000] offer with the customer to halve the balance outstandingrepresented the marginal cost of the water used and what was subsidised by Hunter Water’s wider customer base.”

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One Nation leader Pauline Hanson wears burqa in Senate

One Nation leader Pauline Hanson wears a burqa during Question Time at Parliament House. Photo: Alex EllinghausenFace fully covered, the woman in black didn’t need to say anything as she entered the Senate.
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Senator Pauline Hanson pulls off the burqa. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Pauline Hanson had made her point.

The One Nation leader took her seat forQuestion Time wearinga black burqa, ahead of her motion to ban the garment due for debate lateron Thursday.

The Queensland senator has rallied against the burqa since returning to Parliament last year.

Senate President Stephen Parry admitted there was not a lot he could do about the stunt.

Senator Hanson entered the chamber shortly after Question Timestarted at 2pm, eliciting groans from the chamber.

While media rushed in to cover the performance, senators from all sides did their best to ignore it, studiously avoiding looking in her direction.

They were forced to look her way when she dramatically shrugged off the garment to ask a question of Attorney-General GeorgeBrandis, calling on him to ban the burqa.

But the Attorney-General’s response, in which he called the stunt “appalling” and both “counselled and cautioned” Senator Hanson for causing offence to religious groups, received an extraordinarystanding ovation from Labor and the Greens.

Labor cheered as Senator Brandis said the vast majority of those who practiced the Islamic faith were law-abiding citizens

“No, Senator Hanson, we will not ban the burqa,” he said.

Coalition MPs remained seated during the standing ovation.

After receiving her answer, Senator Hanson left the chamber, to calls of “good on you George” from Labor senators.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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One Nation leader Pauline Hanson wears burqa in Senate

One Nation leader Pauline Hanson wears a burqa during Question Time at Parliament House. Photo: Alex EllinghausenFace fully covered, the woman in black didn’t need to say anything as she entered the Senate.
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Senator Pauline Hanson pulls off the burqa. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Pauline Hanson had made her point.

The One Nation leader took her seat forQuestion Time wearinga black burqa, ahead of her motion to ban the garment due for debate lateron Thursday.

The Queensland senator has rallied against the burqa since returning to Parliament last year.

Senate President Stephen Parry admitted there was not a lot he could do about the stunt.

Senator Hanson entered the chamber shortly after Question Timestarted at 2pm, eliciting groans from the chamber.

While media rushed in to cover the performance, senators from all sides did their best to ignore it, studiously avoiding looking in her direction.

They were forced to look her way when she dramatically shrugged off the garment to ask a question of Attorney-General GeorgeBrandis, calling on him to ban the burqa.

But the Attorney-General’s response, in which he called the stunt “appalling” and both “counselled and cautioned” Senator Hanson for causing offence to religious groups, received an extraordinarystanding ovation from Labor and the Greens.

Labor cheered as Senator Brandis said the vast majority of those who practiced the Islamic faith were law-abiding citizens

“No, Senator Hanson, we will not ban the burqa,” he said.

Coalition MPs remained seated during the standing ovation.

After receiving her answer, Senator Hanson left the chamber, to calls of “good on you George” from Labor senators.

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A lifetime of works on exhibition

A potrait of the artist Mazie Turner. Picture: Richard Tipping
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AN exhibition of works by Newcastle painter the late Dr Mazie Turner will open at Newcastle Art Gallery in September.

Mazie Karen Turner: Between Dreamand Earthhas been curated by Newcastle Art Gallery’s Sarah Johnson with Turner’s former partner, Richard Tipping, and the Turnerchildren, Grace, Jasper and Kai.

“They have been really wonderful and really opened their doors to me,” Johnson saysof the family’s participation in the show.

“When you are working without theartist there are complexities involved with that. She has been top of mind throughout this process and having the family involved was wonderful.”

Johnson first met Turner in 2012.

“I was a big fan of her practice and got to know her,”Johnson says.“Mazie and I met in her studio and we talked art . . . had a cup of tea and I think the seeds were sown there for an exhibition.

“Sadly, she was very ill at that stage.”

Turner died from cancer aged 59 in 2014.

“Six to nine months after Mazie passed away, Richard invited me down to the studio because they were starting to go through Mazie’s archive,” Johnson says.

The exhibition will feature one of Turner’s works from the Newcastle Gallery collection,Soft Walls.

Another work from the University of Newcastle collection,Out of Darkness,considered by the artist herself to be her“seminal painting”, is also in the exhibition.

In all there are 80 works in the exhibition.

“A lot of people don’t realise she was also an amazing photographer,” Johnson says.“She studied photography and printmaking at university.”

Some of her photographs are in the National Gallery of Australia collection.

In terms of Turner’s painting the exhibition brings forth the artist’s fascination with colour.

“She interrogated colour, she based her PhD study at Newcastle uni on it . . . a really deep intuition, a painter’s painter essentially,” Johnson says.

“She was an artist who was informed by travel and place. Wherever she lived was an important site to inform her practice.”

The exhibition opens at Newcastle Art Galleryon September 2 until November 5.

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Nightclub helps voters check their enrolment

Speak-up: King Street Hotel operations manager Angus Harper at the popular club, which is trying to empower young people. Picture: Marina NeilA popular Newcastle night spot has not only nailed its colours to the mast in support of same sex marriage, staff at the King Street Hotel areoffering practical help to make sure young voters’ voices are heard.
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While puntersin the line-up were waiting to get into the Newcastle West venue on the weekend, staff armed with iPads helped them check that they were enrolled with the Australian Electoral Commission and that their details were up to date.

Anyone 18 or over has to be enrolled to vote at their current address by August 24 in order to take part in the postal vote on same sex marriage later this year.

King Street operations and marketing manager Angus Harper said staff and management at the hotel wanted to empower young people.

“It’s one of those things, I believeyoung people are very encouraging of and very supportive of [same sex marriage] because it does affect all of us,” he said.

“It affects our friends, our family and the community.”

Mr Harper said a post on the King Street Hotel’s Facebook page that came out in support of same sex marriage –and urged people to vote in favour of changing the law –received an overwhelmingly positive response.

The post received more than 1300 likesand 156 shares –more than four times the number of likes King Street’s posts usually got, Mr Harper said.

The idea to give young voters some practical help camefrom a recent staff meeting.

“It became very clear that a lot of people felt very strongly about making a change, but a lot of the younger guys in the room weren’t educated on how to do so,” Mr Harper said.“A lot of them didn’t know it was a postal vote, a lot of them thought they had to turn up at their local primary school and that sort of thing, as occurs in other votes.

“It started as an idea to basically educate our own staff.

“It became evident to us that if our young staff didn’t know that this was the process, a lot of our patronage wouldn’t as well.”

Staff will be on hand again this weekend to check with young patrons in the line-up that they are registered and up to date with the AEC.

Angus Harper at the King Street Hotel. Picture: Marina Neil

“It certainly wasn’t about us, we just want to empower young people,” Mr Harper said.

While the plebiscite will not be legally-binding, the Turnbull Government says it will use the results to inform a decision on whether to introduce legislation to parliament to change the Marriage Act. Survey forms will be mailed to voters from September 12 and the result of the plebiscite willbe announced on November 15.

Visit check.aec.gov419论坛 to find out whether you are enrolled to vote and that your details are up to date.

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City’s 1000 empty homes

THE number of unoccupied homes in Newcastle’s city centre is almostdouble the state average, but housing industry experts say calls for a tax on vacant properties are misguided because it would send the wrong message to investors.
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Census data reveals that 18 per cent of the homesin the 2300 postcode, or about 1000 properties –were empty when the figures were collected in August last year, compared to 10 per cent across the rest of NSW.

While the accuracy of census data for full-time vacant properties is limited by the fact it’s based off the status of a property on census night the figures support a separate Fairfax Mediaanalysis which found there were 100,000 underused houses across NSW and Victoria.

It comes as both the federal and Victorian state governments implementtax penalties for vacant properties amid concerns they help dry up supply and increase house prices and rental costs.

In Maythe Treasurer Scott Morrison announced charges for foreign investors who ownpropertiesthat sit empty for six months or more in a year, and there have been callsin some sectors for a tax on vacant propertiesin NSW.

In March the Victorian Premier, Daniel Andrews, announced owners of empty homes would be taxed1 per cent of the property’s capital-improved value, a measure he said wouldsend a strong message to owners who were “effectively banking an empty property and denying that to the market”.

But Craig Jennion, the executive director of the Housing Industry Association in theHunter, questioned the accuracy of the Census figures and said taxation policies “send the wrong signal to potential investors in Australia”.

“More restrictive taxation policies, including plans to tax vacant homes, limit the share of foreign investment in new projects and increase foreign investor duties all send the wrong signal to potential investors in Australia,” he said.

“Barriers to investment are not productive for the building industry or the economy more broadly as they will have the effect of decreasing supply and potentially increasing rental costs further.

“Investment needs to be encouraged particularly when the investor side of the market has also been hit by tighter lending finance due to APRA’s recent restrictions on interest-only mortgages.”

The debate over vacant properties isoften linked to rental stress because empty homes reduce supply, and according to the census, the number of households whose rent payments are morethan 30 per centof household income is 14 per cent in the Newcastle local government area. But the Grattan Institute’s John Daleysaysa vacant property tax could be hard to enforce and questionedits impact.

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Melbourne Cup Tour in Cessnock on Sunday

ON TOUR: Wendy Green, part-owner of 1999 Melbourne Cup winner Rogan Josh, will visit Cessnock with the Melbourne Cup Tour on August 27.Cessnock residents will get the chance to see an iconic piece of Australian cultural heritageup close this Sunday when theEmiratesMelbourneCup Tour comes to town.
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The$200,000, 18-caratgoldCup is on itsfifteenthannualtourofAustralia and NewZealand,in the lead-up to this year’s race in November.

WhileinCessnock,theCupwillengage in a number of exciting activities including a civic welcome atCessnock Leagues Club at 9.30am and a visit to the Jacaranda Grove retirement village at 10.30am before heading out to Drayton’s Family Wines.

The final stop will be theCessnock TAFE Park, where residents are invited toview the Cupand have photographs taken from 1pm to 4pm.

Cessnock Racecourse Advisory Panel member Bruce Wilson said it was a rare opportunity to see the Cup up close and encouraged local families to taketime out and jointhe celebrations.

“It is exciting to celebrate the country’s most famous horse race in conjunction withour own rich history of horse racing here in the world renowned Hunter Valley region,” Mr Wilson said.

Wendy Green, part-owner of 1999 Melbourne Cup winner Rogan Josh, willbe in attendance to share her unique Emirates Melbourne Cup story.

Referred to as ‘Wendy in Wonderland’, Green jointly-owned Rogan Josh with her son John-Paul Miller and husband Robert.

Victoria Racing Club chairpersonAmanda Elliott said the VRC is excited to bring the magic of the Emirates Melbourne Cup to the people ofCessnock.

“The Melbourne Cup is an Australian cultural icon and is truly the People’s Cup, so we’re delighted to share it with the people, on this its fifteenth annual tour of Australia and New Zealand,” Mrs Elliott said.

The 2017 tour started on July 1 in West Wyalong, wherethe gold used by ABC Bullion to make the trophy is mined.

Other stops on its 31-town journey have so far included Perth, Christchurch, Auckland and Alice Springs.

After visiting Cessnock on Sunday, it will head off to Brisbane, Gold Coast and Lismore,and will also visitSouth Australia and Tasmania before returning to Flemington for ‘the race that stops a nation’on November 7.

Check out the photos from the Melbourne Cup Tour’s stop in Nowra, courtesy of our Fairfax stablemates, the South Coast Register.

Melbourne Cup Tour in Cessnock on Sunday Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Ivan Hunt (right) impressed with the Melbourne Cup at Clelland Lodge on Thursday

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Gladys Spence says her son works at Flemington, and would have loved to see the Melbourne Cup at Clelland Lodge on Thursday.

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Ross Boxsell patting the miniature pony at Clelland Lodge on Thursday.

Margaret Scott in awe of the $200,000 Melbourne Cup at Clelland Lodge on Thursday.

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Melody Lovell, there with her mum, a resident at Clelland Lodge, patting the miniature pony on Thursday

Margaret Moore and Sonia Payne smiling on the special occasion as the Melbourne Cup stops in at Clelland Lodge

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Peter and June O’Neil, married for 56 years, waiting for the Melbourne Cup at Clelland Lodge on Thursday.

Elaine Draine patting the miniature pony at Clelland Lodge, North Nowra on Thursday during the tour of the Melbourne Cup

Toni Neijens and Elanor Lovell, fascinated by the horse inside Clelland Lodge on Thursday

Murel Linkhorn and volunteer Alana James at Clelland Lodge on Thursday

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

Melbourne Cup at Terara Public School

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How the alt-right trolled Triple J’s Hack program

Tom Tilley’s controversial interview with a white nationalist has shed light on the way Australia’s alt-right underbelly attempts to troll the media and misrepresent the views of Jewish Australians.
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Earlier this week, Triple J’s Hack program aired a segment featuring Eli Mosley – one of the organisers of the Charlottesville protests that ended with one woman dead and several injured.

After grilling Mosley, Tilley threw to “Herschel”, who described himself as a Jewish man living in Brisbane. The interview started off as one might expect, with Herschel calling the actions of white nationalists “disgusting”.

On Monday night’s program, the ABC’s Tom Tilley interviewed a caller who claimed to be Jewish and said he welcomed the “end” of white people. Photo: ABC

However, things took a strange turn when Herschel veered from talking about how white nationalists have false grievances to talking about how, as a Jew, he welcomed the “end” of white people.

“They have to learn to accept it,” he said. “It’s certainly beneficial for my people. If the cost they have to pay is them falling and obliterating themselves into nothingness, then that’s the cost they’re going to have to pay.”

When Tilley pointed out this was an “extreme” view, things deteriorated even further.

“I’m sorry, Mr Tilley, but if you promote multiculturalism in any way, that’s what you’re promoting,” Herschel said. “Multiculturalism is the end of white people. And that’s why you have things like Unite the Right. Do you not agree with me?”

Tilley, perhaps realising he was being trolled, then decided to end the interview.

Prior to the Hack segment, Fairfax Media can reveal, members of the so-called alt-right movement had turned to chat rooms and online discussion boards such as 4Chan to encourage sympathisers to flood Triple J’s switchboard with pro-Trump and Charlottesville messages.

“If you’re too pussy to call, then please send them a text, lads!” one person wrote.

However, the online conversations turned from organising to outright joy when they realised “Herschel” had managed to get on air. Many said the Hack segment “surpassed all expectations”.

“Holy f— that Jew larper is a legend,” one anonymous user wrote. “Absolutely amazing subversion.”

“It’s our guy redpilling the masses, saying accept multicult [sic] and die,” wrote another. “F— yes. Legend c—.”

It’s not the first time Hack has been trolled by people pretending to be who they’re not. In 2015, Tilley was forced to apologise to listeners after a serial prankster managed to fool the program into thinking he was in love with his stepsister.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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‘Points for us’: Charlottesville doco on SBS exposes neo-Nazis

A white supremacist involved in the Charlottesville attacks that left three people dead over the weekend has called the murders “justified” and gloated that the extremist march will be “really tough to top”.
Nanjing Night Net

“The fact that nobody on our side died, I’d go ahead and call that points for us,” white nationalist Chris Cantwell grins at the end of Charlottesville: Race and Terror, a Vice documentary on the violent clashes in Virginia on Sunday.

The documentary, which airs on SBS Viceland on Thursday evening, sees reporter Elle Reeve trailing a group of white nationalists and neo-Nazis ahead of Sunday’s Unite the Right rally.

The Vice doco follows white nationalist Chris Cantwell. Photo: Vice

The rally, which saw white supremacists protesting the planned removal of a statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee, turned violent amid resistance from local residents and counter-protestors Antifa.

While many of its most affecting images have already been plastered across news sites, the doco exposes the bigoted ideals and commitment to violence that inflamed tensions in Charlottesville.

Early scenes show a string of alt-righters chanting “Jews will not replace us!” as they march on the University of Virginia with flaming torches in hand.

Cantwell, who shows off the arsenal of guns and weapons he took to Charlottesville, also charts his racist awakening to the police murders of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown and Tamar Rice, which launched the #BlackLivesMatter movement.

“Every single case it’s some little black asshole behaving like a savage, and he gets himself in trouble,” Cantwell tells Reeve. “You gotta take that into consideration when you’re thinking about how to organise your society.”

A Charlottesville resident condemns white nationalist violence. Photo: Vice

Besides the gross rhetoric, Reeve exposes the side’s extremist buffoonery, with one scene showing Cantwell pouring milk into his eyes after being maced.

“What just happened?” Reeve asks Cantwell.

“They maced me… Communists! It’s the second time in two f—ing days!” he replies, with comical frustration.

As he writhes on the grass, pouring a 2L bottle of milk over his skinhead, a voice off-screen yells, “Heil Cantwell!”

But the tragedy of the weekend, weakly condemned by Donald Trump who repeatedly laid the blame for the violence “on both sides” – that is, Nazis and, uh, those there to oppose Nazis – soon comes into focus.

The documentary includes horrific footage of the moment a Nazi sympathiser’s car sped into a group of protesters, leaving three people dead and countless injured.

In the film’s most emotional moment, a Charlottesville resident condemns all who allowed the tragedy to occur under the cheap guise of “free speech” and First Amendment rights.

“There are bodies laying on the ground right now!” he tells Reeve, mere minutes after the attack.

“We told city council, the police, we did not want them here – they let them come! I’ve seen bodies flying, getting hit by that car.

“This is my town!” he adds, voice breaking. “We did not want them motherf—ers here.”

Charlottesville: Race and Terror airs on SBS Viceland at 8pm on Thursday.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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